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BALLOON AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT. PHOTOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT


Balloon aerial photography equipment. Harris welding equipment. Cia spy equipment.



Balloon Aerial Photography Equipment





balloon aerial photography equipment






    aerial photography
  • Aerial photography is the taking of photographs of the ground from an elevated position. The term usually refers to images in which the camera is not supported by a ground-based structure.

  • (Aerial Photograph) An image of a portion of the surface of the earth that is either captured from an oblique angle or from a point perpendicular to the subject area, depending on the intended use.

  • A variety of backdrop imagery may be available.





    equipment
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service

  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.

  • The necessary items for a particular purpose

  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items

  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.

  • Mental resources





    balloon
  • Resembling a balloon; puffed

  • large tough nonrigid bag filled with gas or heated air

  • ride in a hot-air balloon; "He tried to balloon around the earth but storms forced him to land in China"

  • become inflated; "The sails ballooned"











balloon aerial photography equipment - Small-Format Aerial




Small-Format Aerial Photography: Principles, techniques and geoscience applications


Small-Format Aerial Photography: Principles, techniques and geoscience applications



As the need for geographical data rapidly expands in the 21st century, so too do applications of small-format aerial photography for a wide range of scientific, commercial and governmental purposes. Small-format Aerial Photography (SFAP) presents basic and advanced principles and techniques with an emphasis on digital cameras. Unmanned platforms are described in considerable detail, including kites, helium and hot-air blimps, model airplanes, and paragliders. Several case studies, primarily drawn from the geosciences, are presented to demonstrate how SFAP is actually used in various applications. Many of these integrate SFAP with ground-based investigations as well as conventional large-format aerial photography, satellite imagery, and other kinds of geographic information.


*Full-color photographs throughout
*Case studies from around the globe
*Techniques presented allow for image resolution impossible to match via traditional aerial photography or satellite datasets
*Glossary clarifies key terms










86% (8)





Caquot Type R Observation Balloon




Caquot Type R Observation Balloon





Tethered balloons allowed World War I observers to see as far as 40 miles behind enemy lines to spot troop movements, chart trench systems and direct artillery fire. The observation balloon most used by Americans was named for its designer, French engineer Lt. Albert Caquot. The hydrogen-filled balloon could lift two passengers in its basket, along with charting and communications equipment, plus the weight of its mooring cable, to a height of about 4,000 feet in good weather. Normal operations were between 1,000 and 4,000 feet. During WWI, American balloon observers directed artillery fire at targets such as troop concentrations and supply dumps. They noted more than 1,000 enemy airplane sightings, 1,000 instances of military traffic on railroads and roads and 400 artillery batteries.

Caquot balloons were manufactured in great numbers in WWI; nearly 1,000 were made in the United States in 1918-1919. During World War II, the British produced Caquots once again, but in limited numbers. Manufactured in 1944, the balloon displayed at the museum is believed to be the only survivor. The British used it for parachute testing and noncombat aerial observation and photography until 1960. The British Ministry of Defense, Royal Aircraft Establishment, presented the Caquot to the museum after it was located with the aid of American and British WWI balloon veterans in 1975. Assisted by the Goodyear Aerospace Corp. of Akron, Ohio, which had produced these balloons during WWI, museum personnel mended and sealed the balloon fabric and prepared it for inflation. It was placed on display in May 1979.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Gas capacity: 32,200 cu. ft.
Length: 92 ft.
Diameter: 32 ft.











Caquot Type R Observation Balloon




Caquot Type R Observation Balloon





Tethered balloons allowed World War I observers to see as far as 40 miles behind enemy lines to spot troop movements, chart trench systems and direct artillery fire. The observation balloon most used by Americans was named for its designer, French engineer Lt. Albert Caquot. The hydrogen-filled balloon could lift two passengers in its basket, along with charting and communications equipment, plus the weight of its mooring cable, to a height of about 4,000 feet in good weather. Normal operations were between 1,000 and 4,000 feet. During WWI, American balloon observers directed artillery fire at targets such as troop concentrations and supply dumps. They noted more than 1,000 enemy airplane sightings, 1,000 instances of military traffic on railroads and roads and 400 artillery batteries.

Caquot balloons were manufactured in great numbers in WWI; nearly 1,000 were made in the United States in 1918-1919. During World War II, the British produced Caquots once again, but in limited numbers. Manufactured in 1944, the balloon displayed at the museum is believed to be the only survivor. The British used it for parachute testing and noncombat aerial observation and photography until 1960. The British Ministry of Defense, Royal Aircraft Establishment, presented the Caquot to the museum after it was located with the aid of American and British WWI balloon veterans in 1975. Assisted by the Goodyear Aerospace Corp. of Akron, Ohio, which had produced these balloons during WWI, museum personnel mended and sealed the balloon fabric and prepared it for inflation. It was placed on display in May 1979.









balloon aerial photography equipment








balloon aerial photography equipment




The New Earth from Above: 365 Days: Revised Edition






The New Earth From Above: 365 Days is now fully revised and updated. Reaching across the continents, from the icebergs of Antarctica to the cotton fields of India, the breathtaking, full-color photographs are accompanied by informative new text that describes the environmental concerns related to each location. Each chapter of the book opens with an insightful introduction by a different noted author who addresses a subject critical to the future of our planet: agriculture, biodiversity, sustainable development, energy, forests, water, and global warming.

This edition includes 60 new and unpublished photos taken by Arthus-Bertrand over the past few years. The text throughout the book is revised to reflect changes in the world since the last publication, and includes three new authors: the heads of WWF France and the Observatory of Renewable Resources, and the president of Alter Eco, a fair trade firm.

Yann Arthus-Bertrand’s powerful aerial photographs reveal the incidental beauty of our planet and are reminders of our capacity to save or destroy it.










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